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My career in the “world of technology” officially began upon my graduation from Butler University in 1981 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Telecommunications.  My first full-time job was my “dream job", becoming a staff engineer at TRC Recording Studios.  Prior to graduation, some of my other audio related experience included mixing live sound at Kings Island, live audio engineering for Calliope Sound & Lighting and working as a weekend DJ for WFMS radio.   While at TRC I was promoted to Chief Engineer, then Vice President.
 
In 1989 I left TRC to join World Media Group, an emerging multi-media manufacturing company here in Indianapolis.  I was initially hired as their mastering engineer but soon began to move up through the organization. I was promoted to Plant Manager, then Vice President of Operations. In the fall of 2000 I left WMG to re-join the recording industry.  I was hired as the studio manager and marketing director for The Lodge Recording Studios until the spring of 2011 when I decided to “retire” from the recording studio business and go back to college to earn an associates degree in IT/Networking.
 
In the fall of 2001, as ZUMC was about to open their new facility, I was asked to join the worship staff. Working with technology in worship allows me to share my audio gifts to help enhance the experience for the congregation. Along with the time I spend at church and school, I also work as the front-of-house sound engineer for Indianapolis’ own Polkaboy (www.polkaboy.com). 

Upon graduation in December 2012 I was presented with the opportunity to continue my career in operational management and  joined Auralex Acoustics in March of 2013 as their Director of Operations .   Auralex is the acoustics company that provided the acoustical panels that are located on the back wall of our sanctuary!
 
I live in Carmel with my wife Jennifer and our two Miniature Schnauzers; Samson and Chloe Delilah. I have a daughter, Heather who works for Butler University at the Center for Academic Technology.   It appears the “apple” does not fall too far from the tree.

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